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River In The Amazon Kills Everything That Falls Into It

Written by Beatriz Sanchez
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Let’s talk about the boiling river that kills anything that falls into it. It’s in the central Peruvian Amazon, in the middle of low jungle. According to the National Geographic, it’s no easy task to get there: it’s about an hour flight to the city of Pucallpa, the largest city in the central Peruvian Amazon, then a two-hour drive from Pucallpa to the Pachitea river, and from there it’s still 30 more minutes to the mouth of the Boiling River.

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According to Andres Ruzo, a National Geographic Young Explorer who visited the river, it's a place of tremendous spiritual power. ‘A home to very powerful jungle spirits,' says Ruzo, 'where only the most powerful shamans could go because other people were afraid of the spirits.’ Apparently, every site on the river is home to a unique jungle spirit.

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Not many people know this but the river actually starts off as a cold stream, then heats up, and cools back down at night. Most of the flow is so hot, it could kill a human being. Sadly, a lot of animals have ended up boiled alive while trying to satisfy their thirst.

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Whether this river is natural or not, is unknown, but there is a theory that says the river is the result of an oil field accident since it’s only 2 kilometers from the oldest active oil field in the Peruvian Amazon.

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Not many people know this but the river actually starts off as a cold stream, then heats up, and cools back down at night. Most of the flow is so hot, it could kill a human being. Sadly, a lot of animals have ended up boiled alive while trying to satisfy their thirst.

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Whether this river is natural or not, is unknown, but there is a theory that says the river is the result of an oil field accident since it’s only 2 kilometers from the oldest active oil field in the Peruvian Amazon.

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