8 Strange Signs That Could Mean You Will Have Heart Trouble Down the Road

Written by Vanessa Hojda
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Would you be able to know if you’re having heart trouble? You probably know what the more obvious symptoms are, such as:

  • Chest pain
  • Exhaustion
  • Dizziness
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Thanks to the advancements made in medicine, not as many people die of heart disease as they used to. It’s still important to see your doctor often to get your cholesterol and triglyceride levels tested and to pay attention to your body, especially if you’re in the age demographic where heart disease is very likely to occur.

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Did you know there are symptoms that might be less obvious signs of heart disease? Some of them aren’t as obvious as an ache or chest discomfort. Here’s a list of the ones worth paying attention to:

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Bad breath and gum disease. Bad breath isn’t just an embarrassing inconvenience. According to the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, gum disease, which causes bad breath, can be a sign that you could suffer from heart disease. One theory for the correlation is that gum disease can release toxins that may travel through the bloodstream and form plaques in the arteries. Some other symptoms of gum disease besides bad breath are swollen gums, gums that bleed easily when you brush, and loose teeth.

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Excessive yawning. Going to the gym can be a drag, so it’s normal to yawn out of boredom (or sleepiness, if you’re an early morning gym-goer). However, if you can’t stop yawning, something worse than boredom might be taking place. A study found that excessive yawning could be a sign of a vasovagal reaction, which is when blood to a part of the heart is blocked. This blockage stops oxygen from getting to the heart, which can damage the heart and cause cardiac arrest.

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Feeling light-headed when you get up. A study showed that if your blood pressure drops suddenly when you get up, you might be at risk of developing heart disease down the road. The researchers only found a correlation and couldn’t explain the reason why this happens, but they speculated that high blood pressure and sudden drop in blood pressure operate through similar mechanisms. They strongly suggested that people at risk for heart disease who experience a lot of dizziness should go see their doctor.

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An earlobe wrinkle. Back in 1973, a scientist named Sanders T. Frank carried out a study where he found that people with a certain diagonal wrinkle in their ear were more prone to heart disease. Today, many scientists have found a strong relationship between the two. One likely explanation is that the ear creases when the elastic tissue around small blood vessels degenerate, which in turn points to a more serious change happening around the blood vessels of the heart.

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